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CCJS 345 6382 Introduction to Security Management (2225)CCJS-345

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CCJS 345 6382 Introduction to Security Management (2225)CCJS-345

  • Summer 2022
  • Section 6382
  • 3 Credits
  • 05/18/2022 to 07/12/2022

 Faculty Contact


Mark Weissman [email protected]

 Course Description


(Formerly CCJS 445) Prerequisite: CCJS 100. A study of the history, concepts, principles, and methods of organizing and administering security management and loss prevention activities in industry, business, and government. The objective is to manage security duties, evaluate and apply risk management principles, and evaluate administrative and operational issues. Discussion covers both private and governmental risk assessment and management and the protection of assets, personnel, and facilities. Students may receive credit for only one of the following courses: CCJS 345, CCJS 445, or CCJS 498G.

 Course Introduction


This course will prepare you to assume a variety of positions in the security industry. We will examine the various principles and concepts needed to carry out security missions in a variety of organizational settings. You will use your critical thinking skills to apply a variety of core security principles to actual, real-life situations. 

The course consists of the following modules: 

Module 1: The Security Manager

  • examines the role of security managers as senior security professionals in an organization and how they develop and implement the organization’s security plan
  • defines the terms of management and leadership, the various leadership styles, and the necessity for the security manager to combine the appropriate management techniques and leadership styles to successfully accomplish the security department’s mission and goals

Module 2: Security Components: Operational Considerations

  • identifies the various components of a security plan and the process of planning and developing an individual security plan
  • outlines the design and development of a crisis management plan to prevent the interruption of essential and critical services (business continuity component)
  • examines the various types of security equipment (e.g., access control, alarms) that are combined to provide a fully integrated security system

Module 3: Managing Your Resources

  • identifies the methods employed by an organization’s security department to recruit, hire, and train its members
  • outlines methods to develop operational and capital budgets for an organization’s security requirements

Module 4: Accountability and Civil Law Issues

  • analyzes the ongoing evolution of the field of security
  • evaluates the impact of change on security investigative policies and procedures, with an emphasis on proper training of security operatives

 Course Outcomes


After completing this course, you should be able to 

• understand the history and evolution of security to effectively manage security duties and responsibilities

• analyze the various security components and career positions, and their inter-relationships within the criminal justice system, to identify career opportunities and effectively prepare for employment in the security field

• evaluate risk management principles and apply them to a variety of security situations and components

• evaluate administrative and operational issues confronting the security profession to make effective decisions

 Course Materials


Click to access your course materials information

 Class Guidelines


Faculty Information

To locate information within your LEO classroom, log in and review your faculty member’s information, which is found in the Overview section of your classroom after clicking on the Content link.

Contacting your Faculty Member

You can use the Instant Messages feature within the classroom to send a message to your faculty member when instructor is online. The quickest method is email: [email protected]

Click the Classroom Walk-Through Videos link below, and then click The Instant Messages link, to view a how-to video on how to use the Instant Messages function within the classroom:

 Classroom Walkthrough Videos Link

Within the Content section of your classroom, view the Overview section or Additional Course Information section within the Syllabus to learn more about contacting your faculty member.

Preparation:

In anticipation of beginning this class the student should:

  1. Review the orientation to LEO
  2. Review the Course Contents for the weekly schedule of reading assignments and projects
  3. Prepare a personal schedule that will accommodate
    1. Frequent participation in the weekly discussions
    2. Research to support discussion responses as well as course projects
    3. Preparation of course projects and papers
  4. Check any computer system requirements to support access to LEO and any software used by the course. 

Classroom Management:

Students should make a habit of checking the class ANNOUNCEMENTS on a regular (daily) basis. This is where the instructor will advise the entire class of any changes to the syllabus, anticipated assignments, grade posting and other items impacting on the entire class.

Students will be responsible for reading all assigned course materials scheduled for the week.  When this class is conducted in an on-line environment, students will be presented with one or more questions about a topic for responses and comments in Discussions. The topic, selected by the instructor, will align with the reading assignments and the course outcomes. Students will have an opportunity to demonstrate their mastery of the materials, and the course outcomes by their participation in Discussions.  Personal research is always appreciated and may be required.

Time on Task

For an eight-week course, you should expect to spend about five hours per week in class discussion and activities (online or on-site) and two – three times that number of hours outside the class in study, assigned reading, and preparation of assignments. 

You are expected to achieve the same intended learning outcomes and do the same amount of work in an online course as you would in any on-site course. Active participation is required in all online courses, and you should expect to log in to your online courses several times a week.

Participation

In registering for a Web-based course, you have made a commitment to participate in your course discussions as well as in other online activities. Please plan to participate regularly. Participation for this course is defined as proactive discussion in weekly discussions and engagement in discussion questions. You will need to actively reflect on the weekly reading assignments of course materials or other assigned research to develop original ideas in your responses.

You are expected to demonstrate critical thinking and an understanding of the assigned readings as they relate to the issues identified in each discussion. You are expected to make your own contribution to a main “thread” as well as to respond with value-added comments to the postings of at least two of your class colleagues. You are encouraged to respond to other students as well, and to your instructor. Note that your online Discussion participation counts significantly toward your final grade. Participation in Discussions will be graded several times during the course with feedback to each student.

You are expected to adhere to the general rules of online etiquette. To prepare to use the online discussions, read the notes on participation and online etiquette on the UMGC Web site. Keep those notes handy; you may need to refer to them during the course.

Discussion questions will be available Wednesday at 12:01AM EST and are DUE Tuesday by 11:59pm EST.

Course assignments are another opportunity for students to demonstrate their mastery of course outcomes, and critical thinking, as well as their composition skills. The requirements for each course project are described in detail in the actual course. Grading rubrics are used by the instructor to ensure objectivity and a common basis for grading across different sections of the course. Students will receive feedback in each graded assignment.

This course may be conducted as a “hybrid”, combining in-class and online instruction. The Participation portion of the course grade will include the student’s role in classroom-based activities and exercises. Classroom sessions are another opportunity for students to demonstrate critical thinking, familiarity with the course material, and personal research as well as their mastery of the course outcomes. In Class activity may include guided discussion, in-class debate, student presentations, role-play, etc.

Preferred Method of Contact 

Email: [email protected] This information is available in the classroom announcements as well.

Supplemental Material 

In addition to the course material identified in the weekly Reading Assignments in Course Content, each instructor may include additional instructional materials for their class.  These materials will be available in the classroom or by Internet links.  The Reading Assignments in the Class Schedule will indicate when these materials should be read or viewed. Internet-based materials are available by hyperlink. Any difficulty with a hyperlink connection should be reported to the instructor.

Late Policy

Assigned work must be submitted by the date and time set in the class by the instructor. Please notify the instructor of any perceived conflict in the submission requirements.

If your life is going to interfere with this class (vacations, TDY assignments, etc.), your instructor is available to discuss changing due dates for those assignments that will be affected, but ONLY if such arrangements are made in advance. If you have a documented emergency, please contact your instructor as soon as possible to discuss any late assignments (e.g., military orders, obituary, hospital discharge, etc.). Documentation may be required to qualify for due date changes or penalty-free late submissions. Vacations or TDY assignments do not constitute emergencies. Personal equipment failure may not qualify as an emergency for these purposes. Timely communication with your instructor is imperative.

If the instructor agrees in advance to a deferred due date, any late penalties will be imposed after that deferred date.

Unauthorized late submissions are subject to the following penalties:

  • For every 10 hour period that an assignment is late, 10% of the available points for the assignment will be deducted from the grade.
  • For every 5 hour period that an assignment is late, 5% of the available points for the assignment will be deducted from the grade.
  • The maximum deduction for late assignments is 50%.
  • Any assignment more than 5 days late will not be accepted unless per-arrangements have been made with the instructor. A grade of zero will be imposed on the assignment.

If the cause for a late submission is not known in advance of the due date, the student may request consideration for a waiver of the imposed late penalties due to emergency or unforeseen circumstances which made submission of the assignment on time impossible (e.g. sudden illness, medical condition, or injury causing hospitalization, death of an immediate family member, etc.). Again, documentation may be required to qualify for penalty-free late submissions.

All graded course work must be submitted by 11:59 pm EST on the last scheduled day of the class unless the student requests and meets all of the eligibility criteria for an Incomplete (I) course grade. (See UMGC Policy 170/71 Policy on Grade of Incomplete.) This includes students who have been granted special considerations by the UMGC Office of Accessibility Services.

Due dates: All due dates/times are U.S. Eastern time on the date and time indicated. The server on which this classroom is hosted is set to Eastern Time. To calculate the equivalent for your own time zone, use The World Clock at http://www.timeanddate.com/worldclock/

Extra Credit Policy

No extra credit will be available in this class unless the opportunity is available to all students and generated by your instructor prior to the beginning of the class.

Effective Writing Center and UMGC Library Services

Students are reminded of the services that are available to them. Links to the Effective Writing Center and UMGC Library Services are available under Resources on the classroom tool bar.

Academic Writing 

It is very important, when writing an academic paper, to present your original views, thinking and analyses to demonstrate to your instructor that you understand the material you are discussing as well as your critical thinking, analysis and insight into the topic. It is important that your paper reflect your original views, thinking, and analyses, expressed in your own words, supported by primary and secondary sources

Written submissions for this course may not include any quoted content from any course material or outside source. Course submissions may include information from source material that has been summarize or paraphrased, using your own original wording, citing the source with both an in-text citation and a full citation of the Resources page using 7th edition. 

There is a substantial amount of information on how to write an academic paper within the classroom, in Content -> Course Resource -> Writing Resources. In addition, the Effective Writing Center (Resources->, Effective Writing Center) and the UMGC Library ( Resources-> Library -> Ask a Librarian) are always available to assist you in writing a stronger academic papers. If you have questions regarding restrictions on quoted material in your class submissions, ask your professor.

 Grading Information


You are responsible for the following graded items: 

 Projects70%
 Discussions30%
 Total100%

 Project Descriptions


Note: Detailed information and instructions for each project can be found under the Table of Contents > Course Content tabs. Students must comply with the instructions under Course Content

 Academic Policies


ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

University of Maryland Global Campus (UMGC) has adopted a Philosophy of Academic Integrity to guide the university’s commitment to a culture of academic integrity and authentic education encompassing a set of dispositions and behaviors that are socially beneficial, educationally critical, and professionally necessary.

All members of the University community must maintain the highest level of integrity across the academic experience. For students, intellectually honest academic work represents independent analysis, acknowledges all sources of information that contribute to the ideas being explored, and ensures the ability to engage in life and work authentically. Your instructor is your primary resource for how to uphold the highest ethical standards in the context of this course’s specific requirements.  

Turnitin is enabled within the classroom to support the development and assessment of authentic student writing. To learn more about Turnitin, the feedback it provides, how to use feedback to improve your work, and your options regarding the inclusion of your work in the Turnitin database, visit University guides for Turnitin at sites.umgc.edu/library/libresources/turnitin.cfm and https://sites.umgc.edu/library/libresources/turnitin.cfm#studentcopyright.

Other Academic Integrity resources and guidelines are found at https://www.umgc.edu/current-students/learning-resources/academic-integrity/index.cfm.

CLASSROOM CIVILITY

University of Maryland Global Campus is committed to the success of our global community and values the diverse identities and backgrounds of our students, faculty, and staff. Each one of us has a broader life and set of experiences beyond UMGC that we bring with us to each interaction. Sharing your story with your classmates provides opportunities to learn, relate, and gain inspiration from each other. Engagement often begins with introductions at the beginning of the course. Sharing your preferred name, preferred pronouns, and other details about yourself and your life builds a foundation for connection, understanding, and a richer and more personalized learning experience.

We also recognize that some of life’s responsibilities and challenges outside of the classroom, such as childcare, a change in employment status, or illness, have an impact on success in a course. To the extent you are comfortable, we encourage you to communicate with your faculty member or Success Coach about any concerns you have for this course or as a student at UMGC so we can help you navigate potential obstacles and stay on track to achieve your goals.

Students are expected to work together cooperatively, and treat fellow students and faculty with respect, showing professionalism and courtesy in all interactions.  Please review the Code of Civility for more guidance on interacting in UMGC classrooms: https://www.umgc.edu/students/support/studentlife/conduct/code.cfm.

POLICIES AND GUIDELINES

UMGC is committed to ensuring that all individuals are treated equally according to Policy 040.30 Affirmative Action, Equal Opportunity, and Sexual Harassment

Students with disabilities who need accommodations in a course are encouraged to contact the Office of Accessibility Services (OAS) at [email protected], or call 800-888-8682 or 240-684-2287.

The following academic policies and procedures apply to this course and your studies at UMGC.

150.25Academic Integrity Policy The University expects all members of the university community—students, faculty, and staff—to use guidelines to work with and promote integrity. If you are aware of any academic misconduct, please contact [email protected] All cases of academic misconduct will be addressed in accordance with Policy 150.25 and associated procedures.You are expected to engage in new learning that furthers your development of knowledge, skills, and abilities in each course. According to this policy, you may not submit a substantial portion of any coursework that you have submitted to any course previously without express written approval through assignment guidelines or other forms of communication. You must use UMGC course materials responsibly. Uploading course materials to any website outside of UMGC’s online classroom is prohibited by this policy.
151.00Code of Student Conduct
170.40170.41170.42The following policies describe the requirements for the award of each degree: Degree Completion Requirements for the Graduate SchoolDegree Completion Requirements for a Bachelor’s DegreeDegree Completion Requirements for an Associate’s Degree
170.71Policy on Grade of Incomplete – The mark of I is exceptional and considered only for certain courses. Students who have completed 60% of their coursework with a grade of B or better for graduate courses or C or better for undergraduate courses and request an I before the end of the term. The mark of I is not available for noncredit courses.
170.72Course Withdrawal Policy – Students must follow drop and withdrawal procedures and deadlines available at https://www.umgc.edu/ under Academic Calendar.
130.80Procedures for Review of Alleged Arbitrary and Capricious Grading – appeals may be made on final course grades as described herein.
190.00Intellectual Property  – All university faculty, staff, and students must comply with University guidelines on the use of copyrighted material. Uploading UMGC or faculty copyrighted material without authorization degrades and corrupts the integrity of the teaching and learning experience and is a potential violation of UMGC policy and copyright law. You must obtain permission to post UMGC or other’s copyrighted material to third-party websites, including social learning network sites. UMGC reserves the right to take appropriate action to remove copyrighted material uploaded without authorization.
205.06Calculation Of Grade-Point Average (GPA) for Inclusion on Transcripts and Transcript Requests – Note: Undergraduate and graduate courses have different Grading Policies.  See Course Syllabus for Grading Policies. 
270.00Acceptable Use – The security of the online classroom is critical to ensuring a strong culture of academic integrity and authentic education at the University. It is a violation of the University’s policies for anyone to share logon, password, and any other secure information about a UMGC online account, including credentials required to access the online learning environment.

GRADING

According to UMGC’s grading policy, the following marks are used:

 UndergraduateGraduate
A 90-100 90-100
B 80-89 80-89
C 70-79 70-79*
D 60-69 N/A**
F 59 or below 69 or below
FN Failure-Non attendance Failure-Non attendance
G Grade Pending Grade Pending
P Passing Passing
S Satisfactory Satisfactory
U Unsatisfactory Unsatisfactory
I Incomplete Incomplete
AU Audit Audit
W Withdrew Withdrew

* The grade of “B” represents the benchmark for graduate courses. Students must maintain a Grade Point Average (GPA) of 3.0 or higher. Classes where final grade of C or F places a student on Academic Probation must be repeated.
** UMGC does not award the grade of D in graduate courses.

GRADE ROUNDING

Scores to individual assignments are calculated based on rubrics in the class and are not rounded to the whole point. The final grade for the course is determined by weighted average and will be rounded to the nearest whole point using mathematical rule (grades with .5 and above to be rounded to the next whole point). 

EXTRA CREDIT

Assignments are designed to enable students to achieve course objectives and succeed in the program. In the interest of equity and fairness, there will be no extra credit opportunities. All assignments are identified in the syllabus. 

COURSE EVALUATION SURVEY

UMGC values its students’ feedback. You will be asked to complete an online evaluation toward the end of the term. The primary purpose of this evaluation process is to assess the effectiveness of classroom instruction in order to provide the best learning experience possible and make continuous improvements to every class. Responses are kept confidential. Please take full advantage of this opportunity to provide your feedback.

LIBRARY SUPPORT

Extensive library resources and services are available online, 24 hours a day, seven days a week at https://sites.umgc.edu/library/index.cfm to support you in your studies.  The UMGC Library provides research assistance in creating search strategies, selecting relevant databases, and evaluating and citing resources in a variety of formats via its Ask a Librarian service at https://www.umgc.edu/library/libask/index.cfm.

EXTERNAL LINK DISCLAIMER

This course may contain links to external sites neither owned nor maintained by UMGC. UMGC bears no responsibility for the accuracy, legality, or content of external sites or for that of subsequent links. In addition, the terms of use, security policies, and privacy policies may differ from those of UMGC. Contact the external site for answers to questions regarding its content, terms of use, and policies.

LEARNING MANAGEMENT SYSTEM SUPPORT

Those requiring technical assistance can access [email protected] Support directly in LEO under the Help menu.  Additional technical support is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week via self-help and live chat at https://www.umgc.edu/help/ or by phone toll-free at 888-360-8682.

SYLLABUS CHANGES

All items on this syllabus are subject to change at the discretion of the Instructor and the Office of Academic Affairs.

 Class & Assignment Schedule


Students can access their complete list of assignments and their corresponding due dates within the Assignments section of the classroom by navigating to the Assignments section of the class from the main navigation bar. Follow the link below, and then click Assignments, for a video demonstration on how to utilize this feature.

Classroom Walk Through Videos Link

Students also have access to a calendar tool on the course homepage within the classroom.

SESSIONTOPICASSIGNMENTS
Week 15/18-5/24 Defining Private Security and its Role in Protecting AssetsStandards and Goals for Private SecurityPublic and Private PolicingASIS International and Industry ProfessionalismWeekly ReadingDiscussions
Week 2 5/25-5/31Security Threats and Issues Confronting OrganizationsAssessing and Managing RiskRequired Competencies of Security ProfessionalsTrends in SecurityWeekly ReadingDiscussions
Week 3 6/1-6/7Employing Physical and Procedural Security Controls to Protect Assetshe Changing Role of Private Security Since September 11, 2001Weekly ReadingDiscussionsDUE Project 1
Week 4 6/8-6/14Emergency Preparedness and Contingency Planning to Protect AssetsContingency PlanningFEMA, OSHA — Managing Health and Safety in the WorkplaceWeekly ReadingDiscussions
Week 5 6/15-6/21Security Operations and the LawWeekly ReadingDiscussionsDUE Project 2
Week 66/22-6/28Private Security Education and TrainingCurbing Theft Through Effective Internal Controls – Selection of PersonnelPrivate Security Accountability Through RegulationWeekly ReadingDiscussions
Week 76/29-7/5Violence and Drugs in the Workplace – Strategies for Prevention and ManagementComputer and Information SecurityWeekly ReadingDiscussions
Week 87/6-7/12Security Directors and Ethics: Challenges and Related IssuesPrivate Security’s role in Protecting Homeland Security – Partnerships with Law EnforcementThe Future of SecurityWeekly ReadingDiscussionsProject 3 DUE: No later than SUNDAY 7/10/22 by 11:59 p.m. EST